Veteran’s Aid and Attendance

Veteran’s Aid and Attendance

Is VA Aid and Attendance a possibility?

The Aid and Attendance benefit is available to wartime veterans and their surviving spouses who are now seniors and facing long-term care costs such as home care, assisted living facility fees and nursing home expenses.

Qualifying for the VA Aid and Attendance benefit can be challenging.  This is especially true since major the changes to the Aid and Attendance benefit that went into effect on October 18, 2018.

Basic eligibility rules include an array of service, income, and asset requirements that must be met before the benefit can be awarded. The Aid and Attendance benefit also requires a qualifying veteran or their surviving spouse to be paying for long-term care expenses that are unreimbursed by health insurance, medicare or long-term care insurance.

These hurdles can seem daunting to families who need extra income to pay for care and have been told they have too much money to qualify. The Certified Elder Law Attorneys at Hurley Elder Care Law can devise a strategy to allow veterans or a surviving spouse to qualify for the benefit.

The Basics

There are now over 25 million US veterans eligible for of VA benefits. Most believe they are only entitled to benefits if they were actually wounded or disabled while they were serving in the armed forces. Few vets realize that VA special pensions exist, including the Aid and Attendance Pension (and their local VA office won’t tell them about it!). Many vets are battling chronic conditions and struggling to pay for their care. VA special pensions are just one tool that we can look to when helping people plan for their long term care needs. We can help you understand what the options are and how to access under utilized benefits available to veterans and their or surviving spouses.

We take a comprehensive, hands on approach to planning for Veterans and their spouses. Our goal is not only to obtain the benefits a veteran may be entitled to but also to protect the assets of the veteran and spouse. We work to preserve the resources the veteran and spouse need to ensure their complex and evolving care needs are met throughout their lives. We provide a detailed asset plan that not only makes obtaining benefits possible but also protects eligibility for other benefits they may need in the future such as Medicaid.


Eligibility requirements if you are a single veteran requiring care

 

 

 

In 2018 a single veteran is eligible for a maximum of $1,830 per month.

A single veteran can have no more that $123,600 in total assets (as of October 18, 2018). This amount includes retirement assets but excludes a home and a vehicle.

There is NO specified income limit for VA pension benefits. The VA has it’s own definition of income which they utilize in examining an application. Your income for “VA Purposes” is your gross income less your unreimbursed medical expenses.

The VA has instituted a 36-month look back period for assets. This means that if you have given away any assets in the 36 months prior to applying for VA benefits, you may incur a penalty period or be disqualified for VA benefits. Consulting with a Certified Elder Law Attorney can help you determine the best way to qualify given your circumstances, and the quicker you act, the more options you will have.

Click here to contact us regarding Veteran’s Benefits. We will look at your specific situation and find ways that we may be able to help!

Click here for a list of possible medical expenses.

Click here for eligible dates of service.

 

 

 

Eligibility requirements for a married veteran requiring care

 

 

In 2018 a married veteran is eligible for a maximum of $2,169 per month.

A married veteran can have no more that $123,600 in total assets (as of October 18, 2018). This amount includes retirement assets but excludes a home and a vehicle.

There is NO specified income limit for VA pension benefits. The VA has it’s own definition of income which they utilize in examining an application. Your income for “VA Purposes” is your gross income less your unreimbursed medical expenses.

The VA has instituted a 36-month look back period for assets. This means that if you have given away any assets in the 36 months prior to applying for VA benefits, you may incur a penalty period or be disqualified for VA benefits. Consulting with a Certified Elder Law Attorney can help you determine the best way to qualify given your circumstances, and the quicker you act, the more options you will have.

Click here to contact us regarding Veteran’s Benefits. We will look at your specific situation and find ways that we may be able to help!

Click here for a list of possible medical expenses.

Click here for eligible dates of service.

 

 

Eligibility requirements if you are a surviving spouse requiring care

 

 

In 2018 the surviving spouse of a veteran is eligible for a maximum of $1,176 per month.

A single veteran can have no more that $123,600 in total assets (as of October 18, 2018). This amount includes retirement assets but excludes a home and a vehicle.

There is NO specified income limit for VA pension benefits. The VA has it’s own definition of income which they utilize in examining an application. Your income for “VA Purposes” is your gross income less your unreimbursed medical expenses.

The VA has instituted a 36-month look back period for assets. This means that if you have given away any assets in the 36 months prior to applying for VA benefits, you may incur a penalty period or be disqualified for VA benefits. Consulting with a Certified Elder Law Attorney can help you determine the best way to qualify given your circumstances, and the quicker you act, the more options you will have.

Click here to contact us regarding Veteran’s Benefits. We will look at your specific situation and find ways that we may be able to help!

 

Click here for a list of possible medical expenses.

Click here for eligible dates of service.

 

 

Eligibility requirements if you are a qualifying veteran and your spouse requires care

 

 

In 2018, the spouse of a veteran who requires care is eligible for a maximum of $1,436 per month.

A single veteran can have no more that $123,600 in total assets (as of October 18, 2018). This amount includes retirement assets but excludes a home and a vehicle.

There is NO specified income limit for VA pension benefits. The VA has it’s own definition of income which they utilize in examining an application. Your income for “VA Purposes” is your gross income less your unreimbursed medical expenses.

The VA has instituted a 36-month look back period for assets. This means that if you have given away any assets in the 36 months prior to applying for VA benefits, you may incur a penalty period or be disqualified for VA benefits. Consulting with a Certified Elder Law Attorney can help you determine the best way to qualify given your circumstances, and the quicker you act, the more options you will have.

Click here to contact us regarding Veteran’s Benefits. We will look at your specific situation and find ways that we may be able to help!

Click here for a list of possible medical expenses.

Click here for eligible dates of service.

 

 

 

 


For a deeper dive on the Aid and Attendance benefits

or to read Frequently Asked Questions

Click Here

How can we help you?

Would you like to speak to one of our intake coordinators? Just submit your contact details and we’ll be in touch shortly.